Thaddeus Pham with the Hawai‘i State Department of Health discusses the ABC's of Hepatitis here in Hawai‘i at the West Hawai‘i Civic Center on May 22,2013.


What is hepatitis A?

Hepatitis A is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). It is an acute (short-term) disease that is spread when contaminated fecal matter enters the body through the mouth, usually from close personal contact or through contaminated food and water. There is a vaccine available to prevent infection.

For more information about hepatitis A, go to the CDC website.

 

Hepatatis A in Hawai‘i

Need info on Hepatitis A in Hawaii? Go to the Department of Health website for the latest updates.

 


What Is Hepatitis B?

From our friends at Asian Health Coalition, learn about Hepatitis B, a liver disease that is 100x more infectious than HIV.

Hepatitis B is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). It is usually an acute (short-term) disease for those infected as adults, but it usually becomes a chronic (long-term) disease for those infected as children.

Hepatitis B is spread through contact with blood and other bodily fluids. The most common way to get hepatitis B is from mother to baby, especially for those born in counties in Asia and the Pacific Islands (see map).

Asians, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders tend to be infected at a much higher rate, with an estimated 1 in 10 Asian Americans chronically infected with hepatitis B compared to 1 in 1,000 people in the general population.

While there is no cure for hepatitis B, there are treatments available to manage the disease. In addition, there is a vaccine available to prevent infection.

It is important to know your hepatitis B status because there are many things you can do for yourself, your ‘ohana, and your liver if you have hepatitis B. To learn if you should be tested or vaccinated for hepatitis B, go to Testing and Vaccines.

For more information on hepatitis B, go to the CDC website. You can also find more resources at www.hepbsmart.com


What is viral hepatitis?

Hepatitis means “inflammation of the liver,” and viral hepatitis is a collection of viruses that attack the liver and may lead to liver disease and liver cancer.

 

How many types of viral hepatitis are there?


While there are many types of viral hepatitis, the most common ones in Hawai‘i are hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Unlike hepatitis A, hepatitis B and C often become chronic, long-term infections, are the most serious, and are the most common cause of liver cancer.

 


What Is Hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It is usually a chronic (long-term) infection.

Hepatitis C is spread through direct blood-to-blood contact with someone who has hepatitis C. The most common way to get hepatitis C is through sharing injection drug use equipment, getting a blood transfusion prior to 1992, or having other exposure to blood.

Treatments are available to manage and even cure hepatitis C for some people. There is NO vaccine available to prevent infection.

It is important to know your hepatitis C status because there are many things you can do for yourself, your ‘ohana, and your liver if you have hepatitis C. To learn if you should be tested for hepatitis C, go to Testing and Vaccines.

For more information on hepatitis C, go to the CDC website.